The Education Network for Waltham Forest
 
Supported by Waltham Forest

The Virtual School for Looked After Children (Service)

About our service

The Virtual School for Looked After Children is responsible for ensuring that the Local Authority promotes the educational achievement of the children and young people in its care. The Virtual School for Looked After Children works closely with Waltham Forest Social Services, schools across the country, foster carers and other professionals to ensure that all Looked After Children have the best possible opportunities in school and receive the support they need to achieve their potential.

What we offer

The Virtual School works to ensure that schools, social workers, carers and other professionals understand statutory responsibilities and are aware of best practice around the education of children in care. Communication about our children should be regular and constructive and demonstrate that we are all working together successfully to help them thrive.

The Virtual School does not have its own curriculum, as our Looked After Children are expected to be in full-time education in schools close to their foster placement. Their educational progress and attainment is monitored through the Personal Education Plan process, which is managed by The Virtual School.

As part of our work, we provide training for schools, foster carers and social workers.

The Virtual School manages the Pupil Premium Plus grant for Looked After Children.

For more information regarding the Virtual School, you can visit the Virtual School in the policy and guidance section of The Hub for a broader overview of our work.

Benefits of using our service

The Virtual School for Looked After Children offers a full advisory and support service to social care teams, schools, foster carers and other providers in raising the attainment of Looked After Children.

Contacts

Val Naylor, Executive Headteacher
Val.Naylor@walthamforest.gov.uk

Fay Blyth, Head of School
Fay.Blyth@walthamforest.gov.uk

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Last updated: 22 March 2017 by Barry Fong